I leave for Amravati

Posted By Author on April 12, 2011

25/5/1967:

Finished routine, Sentry duty. Worm infection less. Baba, Rajat and me removed Georgette and bicolour roses into pot for me. Watered them. Luggage was heavy. Baba then went in and I had lemon juice. After bath we all sat near Baba. Gobind returned from Guptakashi with rice and potatoes.

We had a general talk. Baba told that once he gave a note to Niharendu Dutt Mazumdar and in one simile the word ‘too much’ was used. Niharendudada was looking at Baba with surprise. Note dictated by Baba was as below:

11 A.M.
“I used an expression ‘a simile being carried too much’. Nobody, I think, has ever used this expression. The expression in vogue is ‘a simile being carried too far’

Let me explain the difference. A simile being carried too much means being emotionally toned with undue importance of rhetoric giving too much weight to a simile in understanding a thing and coming to a conclusion about it. Carrying a simile too much is an emotional chaos whereas carrying a simile too far is an intellectual anarchy.”

Baba explained this with illustration and example. “One friend said to another, ‘a top-heavy office is bound to fall as a top-heavy house. ‘Here it meant that there was much difference in fat salaries of top officers and workers. It denoted vast difference. But if the friend took it straight that like a collapsible building the office building would collapse. The simile then became emotional. However, if the friend interpreted it that as the base of a house was light and top heavy and hence the building collapsed similarly if at the top a few officers had heavy salary and the rest very meager one then some force would work like gravitational force of the collapse of building and the office would topple, i.e., closed down.  This was intellectual simile.”

Baba then dictated a letter to Kali Chatterjee in Bengali, which Rajat noted down.  In it he was told to send all account of Ashram funds.  It was learnt that he threatened Radhakant.  We then went in for mouth-watering cuisines.  A feat of culinary skill of Baba culminated in a grand feast, indeed. Three vegetables, pulses, rice, chapatis, milk with bananas and sugar, etc.  Baba was sitting in front of us taking personal care.  He told an interesting anecdote as follows.

“Once there was a Bengali thief.  He knew only three English words viz. yes, no and very good.  Once he was caught in a theft and he was brought before a magistrate. The judge asked him ‘have you committed a theft?’ and unknowingly the thief said ‘yes’.  The judge asked him ‘will you return the stolen things? And he said ‘no’ from his three words vocabulary.  Then finally the judge told him ‘then you will have to go to jail’ and he said ‘very good’.

Baba related this anecdote when Nilubabu described Guru Sandip and his team of foreign disciples including Gloria. According to Baba Sandip’s knowledge of spiritualism was similar to that of thief.

I quoted a fun of English manners. An urchin went to a library restricted for members only. Boy said to page, “Excuse me” and entered the library, said, “Pleas” and took a book, said, “Thank you” and left. Baba gave a hilarious laughter.

After very heavy meals siesta was indispensable.  At 5 P.M. Baba called me and told to water the pots that I was to carry.  Then he showed me the varieties of chrysanthemum that I was to carry home.  In his talk he told me that probable dates for Chinu’s rice partaking ceremony were 9th, 12th or 18th June. If I received a call on phone he told me to start immediately and reach here along with Chandrashekhar and Prabhakar. Baba then suggested that I should charter my cousin Bhau Ghatate’s personal four seater Bonanza Beech craft plane, as it would be useful.  After lot of chat he said that I should take down this note. The note is in Hindi translated here:

“ If you get a telephonic message from Delhi then and there Prabhakar should be told in Pune, if it is not possible for any reason he should come to Delhi by the first available plane.”

Baba then told me to send rupees two hundred and fifty to Ashram as soon as I would reach Amravati and none should be sent to Gangtoli camp.  I then paid my parting obeisance to Baba and he went in.

Baba meticulously packed plants for me but were so heavy that about fifty kilos soil was in packing. I was worried.

Gobind and Lala prepared evening meal very laboriously with sweets and what not.  I never saw them doing so for any one else but it exhibited their love and affection for me.  They really loved me. After gossip we went to bed.

26/5/1967:

Got up at 3.30 A.M.  Packed my luggage.  Nilubabu was to accompany me to go to Ashram but it was cancelled at the last moment.  Shomu prepared tea for others.  Then Lala, Gobind, servant Indersingh and I started.  Ramanidada came to see me off.  It was 3.45 A.M. Inder took the heavy parcel of plants on his back and climbed up non-stop.  No one allowed me to carry luggage.  We came to motorable road.  Took rest.  Inder was exhausted.  He did not allow us to take his burden.  Buses left from Guptakashi and we missed the gate.  On way to Kund we sat and separated each plant with a soil wrapped in pieces of cloths of gunny bag. The parcel became light.  Lala and Gobind helped me but I told them not to inform Baba about repacking the plants.  I knew his love for plants and he himself prepared the parcel so that no casualty should be there. They opined that Baba’s packing was not from practical point of view.  At Kunda I offered tea and snacks and cigarettes to all.  My bus came from Okhimath and I left with heavy heart. At Rudraprayag I got only one bus for Rishikesh, which was far off from stand of Rudraprayag.  At Shrinagar took Tiffin packed by Shomu. Reached Rishikesh at 5.45 P.M. Instead of going to Sandip I straightway headed for the railway station by Tonga.  Got berth in Delhi bogie.  Took dinner at Haridwar and slept.

27 & 28/5/1967:

I reached Delhi at 5.30 A.M. and caught Punjab Mail.  Heavy rush.  People began to trample plants and hence kept it safely in privy.  Reached Bhusawal in the morning and as my train was late I could see Howrah express leaving the yard.  Missed badly.  Caught passenger and reached home in the evening.  All was all well at home.

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